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ONE DOLLAR =
ONE KM WALKED

This virtual Walkabout supports The Rotary District 9670 Foundation "END POLIO NOW Campaign. Each dollar raised represents one kilometre virtually walked through first nations lands around Australia.

For every $5 participants receive one ticket in a 50/50 CASH DRAW. Fifty percent of the money raised will go towards the prize pool. After expenses, the remaining funds collected will support The Rotary Foundation END POLIO NOW Campaign. The first 50km virtually walked from RCEM on Wonarua Land, through Awabakal land and onto Woromi land towards Karuah. A map will be regularly updated showing the progress of the virtual walkabout and the prize pool to date. This will also be available on the Rotary Club of East Maitland's Facebook page.

There will be a minimum prize pool of $2000 and a potential maximum of $25,000. The more tickets sold, the greater the prize pool.

ENd Polio
Walkabout
 

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50/50 CASH DRAW

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Day two saw 365 kms virtually walked taking us from Worimi nation then through the nations of Biripi, Daingatti and into Gumbainggir nation.

The total walked to date is 425kms. Well done everyone. Each step is one step closer to eradicating polio.

Day three saw 210kms virtually walked. We have entered the nation of the Nganyaywana/Anewan people. Out toal walked do far is 635km.

Into October we have seen the Walkabout reach 1100km as we near Lightning Ridge. Thank you to everyone for your ticket purchases. We have walked through the nation of Ngarabal and into the Kamilaroi nation.

We are now 1300km into our virtual journey and nearing the town on Brewarrina on our way to Bourke. We are still on the lands of the Kamilaroi nation and pay our respects to elders past, present and emerging. Thank you everyone for purchasing tickets and sharing our page on social media.

On 20th October our virtual walk took us to the town on Wanaaring, the cut line between Bourke and Tibooburra on the lands of the Paaruntyi nation. We pay our respects to their elders, past present and emerging.

On World Polio Day, 24th October, we have reached the 1630km mark and are now in the traditional lands of the Barundji nation. We pay respects to their elders, past, present and emerging as we walk virtually upon their lands.

 

We have now progressed to 2390 kms of virtual walking passing through Karenggapa lands through Tibooburra, through Wandjiwalgu lands and the township of Whitecliffs, through Barundji lands at Wilcannia and on to Wongaibon lands at Cobar. Well done everyone for your support.

We have reached 2870km virtually walked around the new District 9660. We are back in Wonnarua lands and heading home. We have passed through Dubbo, Wellington and Gulgong and are currently in Merriwa. 

Our Progress  

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2870 kilometres walked to date. Well done everyone and thank you for your support.

WonnarUA 

We pay our respects today to the Wonnarua people upon whose lands we walk. The Wonnarua people's traditional lands are located in the Hunter Valley area of NSW. According to the Wonnarua dreamtime, the Hunter Valley was created by the great spirit Baime.  The spirit is embodied in the wedge tailed eagle, found throughout the Hunter Valley.

AWABAKAL 

We pay our respects today to the Awabakal people upon whose lands we walk. Awabakal country encompasses Newcastle, Lake Macquarie and surrounding areas. The eaglehawk or wedge tailed eagle has significance for the Awabakal people. Fishing was a significant part of their diet. They were noted as strong defenders of of their territory.

Worimi 

We pay our respects today to the Woromi people upon whose lands we walk. The Woromi people's lands are located from the eastern Port Stephens areas in the south to Forster/Tuncurry in the north as and far west as Gloucester. The local environment was favourable for hunter-gathering and care for their land. Their totem is the black dolphin.

BIRIPI 

We pay our respects today to the people of the Biripi nation which encompasses the lands of the mid north coast of NSW, from Gloucester eastwards to the coast. The traditional custodians of the lands were mainly located north of the Manning River. The main totems, called mari were the shark, dolphin and stingray.

Daingatti 

We pay our respects today to the people of the Daingatti nation upon whose lands we walk. 

The Daingatti people were custodians of the lands in the Macleay Valley in northern NSW. Their totem is the praying mantis.

GUMBAINGGIR 

We pay our respects today to the people of Gumbainggir lands. The lands encompass the area from the Clarence River then inland towards Guyra and Armidale. The totem for the Gumbainggir nation is the ocean.

Nganyaywana 

Today we pay our respects to the Nganyaywana/ Anewan nation as we virtually walk upon their lands. This nation spans the northern tablelands of NSW. Their totem is the echidna.

NGARABAL 

Today we pay our respects to the Ngarabal nation as we virtually walk upon their lands. This nation encompasses the area of Ashford, Tenterfield and Glen Innes in northern NSW. Their totem is the koala.

KAMILAROI 

Today we pay our respects to the Kamilaroi nation as we virtually walk upon their lands. This nation forms one of the four largest indigenous nations in Australia. It encompasses lands from the Hunter Valley, west towards Lightning Ridge and north towards Mungindi. Their totem is the Dilby the Crow and Kaputhin the Eagle.

KARENGGAPA

The walk to Tobooburra has taken us to the lands of the Karenggapa nation. The name Tibooburra is thought to mean "heaps of rocks" in reference to the large granite outcrops near the town which were regarded as sacred sites. We pay our respects to their elders, past, present and emerging. These lands cover over 14,000 square kms.

The virtual walk today enters the Wandjiwalgu lands into the White Cliffs area. First Nation's people have been moving through this land for around 40,000 years. Today it is a place of interest for gem seekers. We pay our respects to elders past, present and emerging. WW

WANDJIWALGU

BARUNDJI

Our virtual walk has now passed onto the lands of the Barundji people and on to the town of Wilcannia whose name is derived from an indigenous term meaning "gap in the bank where floodwaters escape". The lands cover over 19,000kms. We pay our respects to elders past, present and emerging.

WONGAIBON

Our virtual walk has now passed onto the lands of the Wongaibon people and on to the town of Cobar, named from the indigenous word "kubbur" meaning waterhole or quarry where pigments of ochre, kaolin and blue and green copper minerals were mined for ceremonial use.  Cobar was an important meeting place with ceremonial significance. This town is known for base metals and gold mining. Their main diet was fish, freshwater mussels, crayfish, shrimp, duck and other water fowl, black snake, kangaroo, emu, goanna and seeds. The Wongaibon groups were connected by totem systems. Every person had one totem and some had as many as four. This totem was one's own responsibility and if it was disrespected, punishment would follow. We pay our respects to elders past, present and emerging.

WIRADJURI

 As we virtually enter the lands of the Wiradjuri nation we walk towards the town of  Nyngan. The Wiradjuri people survived as skilled hunter-fisher-gatherers in family groups or clans. These lands are the largest Aboriginal group in NSW. They cover over 127,000 square kms. Their diet included yabbies and Murray cod, kangaroos, emus and food gathered from the land such as fruit, nuts and berries. They were known for their handsome possum skinned cloaks. Their totem is the goanna.